There is nothing natural about loving one another

Fr Hawtin

Doubtless inspired by the rapid approach of the “Season of Good Will,” a radio talk show caller recently opined that all would be right with American society if only people would love each other a bit more.

It’s hard to quarrel with that. Clearly, if drug dealers loved addicts a bit more they wouldn’t enslave . . . → Read More: There is nothing natural about loving one another

It’s caveat emptor when it comes to commentaries

Fr Hawtin

Laity, and many clergy for that matter, would be well advised to bring a skeptical eye to bear when studying many of the books on religious subjects currently on sale. This applies to histories, books on archaeology, and, well, the many commentaries on the scriptures.

The reason for this arises from an intractable fact of . . . → Read More: It’s caveat emptor when it comes to commentaries

You simply can’t redefine sin by the discernment process

Fr Hawtin

For the past half a century or so, America’s mainline churches have shown an increasing enthusiasm for embracing ideas that are unequivocally condemned in the Bible—an inclination that has seriously undermined their standing as arbiters of morality among much of the population.

The curious thing about the controversies embroiling America’s mainline churches—partly, but by no . . . → Read More: You simply can’t redefine sin by the discernment process

Today a policeman’s lot is not a very happy one

Fr Hawtin

Policemen were among our greatest heroes when I was a boy—not just the cops on the silver screen and radio (TV service was quite rudimentary back then), but those who patrolled the highways and byways of England’s villages and cities.

Like their American counterparts, they were tough guys—that goes without saying. But, except on embassy . . . → Read More: Today a policeman’s lot is not a very happy one

Barbarism and decadence: In praise of the bon mot

Political discourse in America, it is fervently to be hoped, reached its nadir in Brooklyn recently when a gathering of witches solemnly cursed the newly installed justice of the Supreme Court, expressing the ugliest of sentiments in language that encompassed both the vile and the banal.

This isn’t a complaint about the fact that these . . . → Read More: Barbarism and decadence: In praise of the bon mot

Prayer Book’s history goes back beyond 16th century

Fr Hawtin

Casual students of Church history are probably under the impression that the first English Prayer Book is the First Prayer Book of King Edward VI, which was authorized for use in 1549. Indeed, this wonderful book is the ancestor of all the Books of Common Prayer in use today.

The English Church played a major . . . → Read More: Prayer Book’s history goes back beyond 16th century

Manners maketh man … or not as the case may be

Fr Hawtin

The ugliness that has characterized what shamefully passes for political discourse in Washington represents a further escalation of the bitter partisanship that has been increasingly poisoning social relationships in the country since the late 1960s.

Once upon a time, spirited partisanship was largely confined to the political arena, manifesting itself among the general public only . . . → Read More: Manners maketh man … or not as the case may be

Is Washington ready for a return of John Wilkes?

The song “A Boy Named Sue” has resonated with me ever since I heard the late great Johnny Cash sing it on the radio. That’s because I share poor old Sue’s problem. Actually, my discomfiture is far greater than his. Sue merely totes a generic girl’s name. I, by contrast, bear the name of Britain’s . . . → Read More: Is Washington ready for a return of John Wilkes?

Mrs Tracey Collins joins the Vestry

Fr Hawtin

Mrs Tracey Collins, a member of the Sunday School staff, has been appointed to join the Vestry in place of the long-serving vestryman Gordon Turner. The daughter of former vestryman Mrs Dorothy Lewis, Mrs Collins has been a member of the parish since the early 1990s. Her daughter Daytona also teaches Sunday School, and her . . . → Read More: Mrs Tracey Collins joins the Vestry

A vital life lesson from a Roman soap opera

Fr Hawtin

Television has never come high among my priorities. Truth to tell, I have never developed the habit of watching much other than the news. This is possibly a consequence of several years of working behind what used to be called the Iron Curtain—a place where television programs were as dull as the architecture. One, I . . . → Read More: A vital life lesson from a Roman soap opera