Manners maketh for a more comfortable life

Fr Hawtin

From “How We Must Speak To Each Other, distributed to students this fall at Michigan’s Hillsdale College, as reprinted in The Wall Street Journal.

Like all human things, speech can be abused. Indeed, it is one of those things we abuse most often. Many colleges and universities today seek to correct such abuse through the . . . → Read More: Manners maketh for a more comfortable life

Jack Kohler: The man who named the Cookie Walk

Fr Hawtin

This year we will be breaking with a tradition of almost 3o years and holding our Annual Cookie Walk on the second Saturday in December rather than the first. We are shifting the sale to Saturday, December 14th to make it easier for our customers to save some their cookies to eat on the day . . . → Read More: Jack Kohler: The man who named the Cookie Walk

Charlotte, not just a name on the honor board

The Charlotte Hawtin Award honors the women who have worked so hard to make the parish a success. Currently we are trying to fix a date to celebrate the latest four honorees: Sara Douglas, Rosa Halbert, Colby Hawks and Martha Miller.

Charlotte Hawtin and Diane Novicki at the 2007 Cookie Walk

As well as . . . → Read More: Charlotte, not just a name on the honor board

Confession from the kitchen: man can’t live by snails alone

Fr Hawtin

Cooking, I must confess, is really not my bag. But since Charlotte was obliged to abandon the kitchen some four years ago, I have improved 100 percent. In all honesty, it has not been such a praiseworthy achievement as I started out from a very low threshold.

The sad fact of the matter is that . . . → Read More: Confession from the kitchen: man can’t live by snails alone

The aphorism: An economical expression of an obvious truth

Fr Hawtin

I have always had a weakness for aphorisms. Really good ones impart instructive truths with a wry smile. Among some frequently quoted favorites are Oscar Wilde’s definition of hypocrisy “vice’s tribute to virtue” and Dr Samuel Johnson’s observation on second marriages “the triumph of hope over experience.”

Recently a friend sent me a collection of . . . → Read More: The aphorism: An economical expression of an obvious truth

Things to be learned from a town’s name

Fr Hawtin

As a child, I was fascinated by maps. In fact, the book that inspired me to learn to read was an enormous old atlas that belonged to my grandfather. Even so, reading was a bitter sweet experience for it led to the discovery that, far from being the largest country in the world, England was . . . → Read More: Things to be learned from a town’s name

Living with anti-Christians

Fr Hawtin

America, judicially and politically, has become decidedly anti- Christian, and the Bible shows that persuading the faithful to collaborate in their own spiritual destruction is one of our opponents’ oldest tricks. The Book of Daniel, for example, the Book of Daniel deals with the subject at length.

It tells how Nebuchadnezzar, King of Babylon, following . . . → Read More: Living with anti-Christians

Polo—a game of princes played here in Maryland

Fr Hawtin

Forget about movie stars! One of Britain’s most popular heroes in the 1950s—for boys, at least—was Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh. It was not so much that he appeared on postage stamps alongside the newly crowned Queen Elizabeth, no less important to us, he was a highly decorated war hero.

Prince Philip was on . . . → Read More: Polo—a game of princes played here in Maryland

Heroes Ancient & Modern: a Memorial Day meditation

Fr Hawtin

The Hollywood stereotype of hero rarely holds true in real life. Whatever you might see in the movies, heroes are by no means invariably young, confident, and athletic. Sometimes they are old and wrinkly: Moses, for example, was nearly 80 years of age when God called him to lead the children of Israel out of . . . → Read More: Heroes Ancient & Modern: a Memorial Day meditation

Mishaps and miracles with a beastly Iron Pig

Fr Hawtin

Nostalgia, I’ve learned over the years, comes in unanticipated waves. In a recent downpour, for example, I was struck by an unexpected nostalgic twinge for the most abominable automobile it has ever been my misfortune to drive.

It was the office car of the Frankfurt Bureau of the Financial Times of London—a 1970 Renault 16 . . . → Read More: Mishaps and miracles with a beastly Iron Pig