Authority in the Church? It’s no longer the Bible

“How on earth did we get into this mess?” is a question frequently on the lips of people horrified with the seemingly never-ending shenanigans that afflict all of America’s mainline churches. Confusingly, perhaps, there is an abundance of answers on offer.

Some blame the problem on church leaders who refer to Jesus as “our mother.” . . . → Read More: Authority in the Church? It’s no longer the Bible

‘Brexit’ echoes the shot heard around the world

It’s odd that, amid the speculative blather from politicians and pundits surrounding Britain’s vote to leave the European Union, none of them seem to recognize the sentiments that prompted it are precisely the same as those that sparked the American Revolution.

Like the 13 American colonies in 1776, the British people are obligated to shoulder . . . → Read More: ‘Brexit’ echoes the shot heard around the world

Socialism is not entirely without its tiny triumphs

A friend—a trusting soul who tries to see the best in everybody—gently chided me last Sunday for being unwarrantably critical of socialism in general and the Soviet Union in particular.

“Can’t you think of anything good so say about the Soviet Union?” he asks. “Surely you have to admit socialism has had some successes.”

He’s . . . → Read More: Socialism is not entirely without its tiny triumphs

Ah yes, I remember it well! But why does nobody else?

It is quite amazing how swiftly the Cold War and the horrors that Soviet-style socialism inflicted on half the countries of Europe have faded from the American political consciousness.

What brings this to mind is that it has gone largely unremarked that Bernie Sanders, challenger to Hillary Clinton for the Democratic Party’s Presidential nomination, was—and, . . . → Read More: Ah yes, I remember it well! But why does nobody else?

Losing the American mind’s capacity for rational thought

Something quite terrifying is apparently happening to the American mind, or at least the more youthful portion of it. It appears to be rapidly losing its capacity for rational thought. Instead of thinking, increasingly it simply seems to “feel.”

In short, it looks as if we, as a people, are swiftly devolving from the sapient . . . → Read More: Losing the American mind’s capacity for rational thought

Biblical theories that ‘ain’t necessarily so’

‘It ain’t necessarily so. It ain’t necessarily so. Things that you’re liable to read in the Bible, they ain’t necessarily so.’ So goes one of the most popular hits from the 1935 opera Porgy and Bess.

These words, however, didn’t necessarily spring forth unprompted from the depths of a cynical secular mind. ‘It ain’t necessarily . . . → Read More: Biblical theories that ‘ain’t necessarily so’

Hooray for the Fourth of July; down with political correctness

The Fourth of July has a special significance for me and, I suspect, most people who, like me, were born elsewhere. It marks the 240th anniversary of the declaration that every living person has the right to “life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness”— thus giving birth to the most exceptional nation on earth.

When . . . → Read More: Hooray for the Fourth of July; down with political correctness

A bold initiative to pack the pews empties them

My second sermon

It is a sobering commentary on the contrariness of fate that the spiritual train wreck currently emptying America’s mainline churches started life 60 years ago as a bold new initiative aimed at packing the pews.

The 1950s Organisation Man was giving way to the Beat Generation, and the world stood at the threshold of the . . . → Read More: A bold initiative to pack the pews empties them

How about this for a cure for the presidential blues?

This year’s presidential election has evoked emotions ranging from elation to outrage, from depression to desperation. The problem is not just that politicians are generally held in low esteem, but that outsiders are also viewed by many with equal contempt.

And, perhaps not coincidentally, the hierarchies and clergy of America’s mainline churches are regarded with . . . → Read More: How about this for a cure for the presidential blues?

Charity will help tame our ‘Age of Ugliness’

dinner party

Popular historians often append labels to past eras: The 18th Century, for example, is variously known as the Age of Reason and the Age of Revolution, while the early 19th Century was approvingly dubbed the Age of Elegance.

On such precedents, one might reasonably call the early 21st Century ‘the Age of Ugliness’—and by no . . . → Read More: Charity will help tame our ‘Age of Ugliness’